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8 new Oregon breweries you should know

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Falling Sky

Just when you thought the Beaver State’s beer scene couldn’t get any better, a slew of new breweries—from upstart nanos to big-name offshoots—are taking things to the next level.


Last year, Oregon beer pioneer and Full Sail founder David Logsdon traded in the big time for small batches and a 10-acre farm. A storybook red barn anchors the hop fields, cattle pasture and a nursery of Sharbeekse cherry trees (imported from Belgium, naturally) and houses the brewery where Logsdon’s organic farmhouse beers take shape. LOOK FOR: Seizoen, an unfiltered ale carbonated with pear juice; watch for a fresh-hopped version in fall.


A Portland brewery… and not an IPA in sight? Montana natives Dan Engler and his nephew Ben prove Beervana’s got more than hop bombs with a small range of German-style staples and seasonals. LOOK FOR: the nippy, estery Hefeweizen, brewed with 70 percent wheat.


Last summer, Eugene homebrewing/winemaking shop Valley Vintner & Brewer changed its name to Falling Sky and expanded with a bright, mod brewpub featuring creative-but-not-too-wacky house beers and a locavore’s dream pub-grub menu. LOOK FOR: the mildly spicy Twisted Branch Juniper Rye Amber. Get a 25-cent discount at the pub whenever it rains!

Portland | THE COMMONS

What began as brewer Mike Wright’s garage nanobrewery is now one of Portland’s most-talked-about tasting rooms. The flagship crisp saison Urban Farmhouse Ale tells you everything you need to know about this gem: It’s a rural-Belgium-inspired brewery with metropolitan soul. LOOK FOR: Flemish Kiss, a Northwest-style pale ale fermented with sour Brettanomyces yeast.


Rock Bottom vet Van Havig and Hopworks alum Ben Love have been pouring collaboration beers (they’ve brewed with Oregon’s Oakshire, Breakside, Pelican and Laurelwood) around town for months; their tasting room opens this spring. LOOK FOR: a saison-and-Brett-yeast-infused, Cognac-aged imperial stout brewed with Anchorage Brewing. But you’ll have to wait: The beer’s resting until winter.


Former Rogue brewer Curt Plant uses the outdoors as his muse to brew GoodLife’s small portfolio in a sprawling industrial space. An attached sunny brewpub/ eatery pours his wares (and others from Bend’s surrounding beer paradise) alongside innovative small plates, and a wide-open beer garden lets visitors enjoy the beer in the environment that inspired it. LOOK FOR: the five-hop stunner Descender IPA.


John Dugan and James Neumeister run the tanks at this dedicated gluten-free brewery—Portland’s first. To brew their three offerings, they swap barley for roasted chestnuts, which they hand-toast on a gas-fired nut roaster from Jordan. LOOK FOR: Harvester’s 5.8%-ABV Northwest-style pale ale; in addition to those chestnuts, there’s sorghum and gluten-free oats in the brew.


Deschutes alum (and former brewmaster Larry Sidor’s right-hand man) Paul Arney has set out to revolutionize brewing processes with an outfit that fuses old-world practice (e.g., wooden vessels) with modern innovation (his own yeast, and unique takes on spontaneous fermentation). Arney blogs, “Chance will be an ingredient in every single brew.” LOOK FOR: Sahalie, Arney’s debut; he promises a non-conformist, wheat-and-pils-malt wild ale mashed, fermented and aged in oak.

PLUS: Beer-swilling Oregonians are indeed eager Beavers as they wait patiently for former Deschutes Brewing brewmaster and beer-making legend Larry Sidor’s new venture, Crux Fermentation Project. Housed inside a former AAMCO Transmission shop in Bend, Crux will spawn small-batch, style-busting beers touched by barrels, wild yeast and experimental hops. Look for bottles and draft pours in Oregon and the Northeast in June.

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