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Church vs. beer

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The folks over at FloatingSheep.org are testing out their DOLLY Project—which mines local geodata on Twitter and presents the results in awesome map form—and a few weeks ago they had a pretty simple question: What’s tweeted about more, church or beer?

The final result is simply good old-fashioned map porn. The darker blue areas denote more beer-centric Twitter locales while darker red spots indicate where churchy exclamations were more common (between June 22 and 29, when the data was collected).

From FloatingSheep’s assessment:

“This map clearly illustrates some fairly big regional divides but it is worth drilling down a bit to see how this plays out at the local level. San Francisco has the largest margin in favor of ‘beer’ tweets (191 compared to 46 for ‘church’) with Boston (Suffolk county) running a close second. Los Angeles has the distinction of containing the most tweets overall (busy, busy thumbs in Southern California). In contrast, Dallas, Texas wins the FloatingSheep award for most geotagged tweets about ‘church’ with 178 compared to only 83 about ‘beer.’”

In total “church” beat out “beer” in volume of tweets, 17,686 to 14,405.

The second, slightly headier map, illustrates the results of Moran’s I test for spatial auto-correlation (yeah, I don’t really know what that is either). Essentially, it shows how neighboring counties can be clustered together based on the popularity of the two subjects tweeted. Interesting divide, no?

More from FloatingSheep:

“Intriguingly there is a clear regional (largely north-south split) in tweeting topics which highlights the enduring nature of local cultural practices even when using the latest technologies for communication.”

There’s plenty more to sift through—with this and other projects—so head over to FloatingSheep.org and check it out.

Or, stick around and get cozy with more beery charts here, here, here and here. Chart nerd.

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