Features
Backcountry beer

Unless you roll with a sherpa, it’s not easy to haul cold beer on your outdoor adventures. Until now. A new breed of backcountry growlers is designed to keep beer cold and carbonated for up to 24 hours.

By Graham Averill

1. Klean Kanteen makes a proper 64-ounce growler, but we like its smaller 16-ounce bottle, which is double-walled and vacuum-insulated for superior temperature control. It’s also pint-sized, and we mean that as a compliment. Fill it with your favorite IPA and throw this munchkin in your pack for a frosty pint at the end of a day hike. $26, kleankanteen.com

2. You like to share? This is your bottle: A full 64-ounce growler that’s double-walled and vacuum-insulated, the Hydro Flask keeps the cold in and the hot out. In fact, it keeps beer chilly for almost a full 24 hours, making it the largest bottle we found that performs this well. The only knock against the Hydro Flask is its weight, a hefty 2 pounds. $50, hydroflask.com

3. Liberty Bottleworks’ aluminum bottles aren’t double-wall constructed, so they don’t keep beer as cold as others, but the bottle is so cool looking, we don’t care. Liberty partners with a handful of artists to create edgy bottle wraps, including custom bottles for craft brewers who want their own reusable aluminum growlers. Bonus: It’s the only metal bottle that’s entirely American-made. $19 for a 24-ounce bottle, libertybottles.com

4. If you’re looking for a true backcountry performer, Stanley’s Nineteen13 might be the ticket. The svelte design and 32-ounce size (big enough for sharing, light enough to pack comfortably) make it an ideal container for backpacking. The bottle is hard plastic with an insulated wrap for a no-sweat effect, keeping beer plenty cold and carbonated after a long 14-hour day in the woods. $28, stanley-pmi.com

But Can You Fill It? Some state ordinances don’t allow brewers to fill bottles without a warning label. Check with your favorite brewer about filling a non-labeled growler like those mentioned here.

 

Published September/October 2012
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