Home Beer 4 take-away trends from Great American Beer Festival 2017

4 take-away trends from Great American Beer Festival 2017

Subtlety reigned at GABF. Except when it didn't.
SHARE
CATEGORIES: Beer   WEST   West Events   West Feature  

Photo © Brewers Association

Photo © Brewers Association

More than 800 breweries poured more than 3,800 distinct beers at this year’s Great American Beer Festival, which took place from October 5-7 in Denver, Colorado. While the massive lineup can be overwhelming, with enough research (read: beer-drinking), some clear trends emerged:

Restrained wild ales
The running joke about Crooked Stave’s sold-out What The Funk?! Invitational—an annual pre-GABF celebration of sour and wild and barrel-aged beers—is that you need to attend with a bottle of Tums at the ready. This year, however, a different sort of wild ale took center stage: More breweries’ offerings displayed reined-in acidity, subtle tartness and quiet funk. There were still a couple puckering pours in the mix, but beers like Alesong’s Mosaic Touch of Brett; Oakshire’s The Carol Situation; and Green Bench’s Les Amis Grisettes were indicative of the growing appreciation for balance and careful expression of acid and funk.

Cool pilsners
Pilsners have lately made inroads among the IPAs and barrel-aged beers at GABF, and this year saw a plethora of delicious takes on the category. MacLeod’s Son of Leod Viking pilsner showcased all Scandinavian malts; pFriem’s Mexican Lager added a bit of corn to the grist; Lewis & Clark’s Pompey’s Pilsner, Drake’s Flyway, Reuben’s Brews Pilsner, Chapman Crafted Pils all offered clean, flavorful takes on Czech and German styles.

All the barrel-aging and adjuncts
But subtlety didn’t rule at every booth. Big, bold, barrel-aged and beefed-up stouts still drew huge crowds. Long lines formed for WeldWerks’ Medianoche bourbon barrel-aged imperial stout (which won gold in the wood- and barrel-aged stout category), as well as for Avery’s Rumpkin rum barrel-aged pumpkin ale and Liquid Mechanics rum barrel-aged coconut porter. At Denver Rare Beer Tasting on Friday, Weldwerks Medianoche Reserva was one of the must-tick, buzzy pours … while it lasted.

New England IPAs
Though it may seem like forever since New England IPAs burst forth and “disrupted” the IPA scene, they weren’t a huge presence at last year’s GABF booths. This year, they were everywhere, literally—from the South (Scofflaw’s Goat Milk IPA) to the Mountain West (Epic’s New England Style IPA) to Colorado itself (The Brew on Broadway New Englewood IPA). A notable exception: The gold medal in the American IPA category went to HailStorm Prairie Madness, a relatively clean IPA featuring American, German and English malts, hopped with Mosaic and Simcoe hops.

SaveSave

SaveSave

 

Author
Kate Bernot is DRAFT’s beer editor. Reach her at kate.bernot[at]draftmag.com.

Brewery Travels
draftmag.com

Brewery Travels: My Favorite Brewery/Beer from Each State

In my ongoing quest to visit breweries all across this great land, I have now surpassed the 400 mark, and they’ve been spread across 37 states and 175+ cities. To celebrate this landmark, I’ve put together a ‘Special Edition’ of Brewery Travels: A rundown of my favorites in each of the states visited so far.

CATEGORIES: Beer   Feature   Midwest Breweries   Midwest Feature   Northeast Breweries   South Breweries   Travel   West Breweries  

draftmag.com

Why a Miller Lite Was the Best Beer I’ve Ever Had

I’ve worked in craft beer for nearly five years now. I’ve had the fortune to try some truly amazing brews: Pliny the Elder, Heady Topper, Bourbon Barrel Aged Expedition Stout. Supplication? I’ve got one in my mini-fridge. The reason I’m telling you this is because I want to frame my statements here properly. I’ve had good beer, trust me. The best beer I’ve ever had, though, was a Miller Lite.

CATEGORIES: Beer   MIDWEST   Midwest Feature  

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

202 queries in 2.812 seconds.