Home Beer How to start a beer cellar

How to start a beer cellar

SHARE
/ 0
CATEGORIES: Beer   Feature  

Whether you’re ready for big-time construction or just have a spare cabinet, here’s how to make the most of a burgeoning beer cellar:

1. Stay cool: A cooler cellar temperature is best (between 50 and 60 degrees F), but it’s most important the temperature not fluctuate.

2. Lights out: Light adversely affects beer chemistry; keep your bottles in the dark.

3. Go big: The higher the alcohol, the longer a beer will last; start by cellaring anything above 8.0% ABV.

4. Skip hops: Don’t waste space in your cellar with hop bombs; hop flavors tend to get stale and fade.

5. Drink and repeat: There’s no hard-and-fast science to cellaring, so whenever possible, get multiple bottles of beers you like and taste them annually to see how the flavors develop.

Tags:

 


Brewery Travels
draftmag.com

Brewery Travels: My Favorite Brewery/Beer from Each State

In my ongoing quest to visit breweries all across this great land, I have now surpassed the 400 mark, and they’ve been spread across 37 states and 175+ cities. To celebrate this landmark, I’ve put together a ‘Special Edition’ of Brewery Travels: A rundown of my favorites in each of the states visited so far.

CATEGORIES: Beer   Feature   Midwest Breweries   Midwest Feature   Northeast Breweries   South Breweries   Travel   West Breweries  

draftmag.com

Why a Miller Lite Was the Best Beer I’ve Ever Had

I’ve worked in craft beer for nearly five years now. I’ve had the fortune to try some truly amazing brews: Pliny the Elder, Heady Topper, Bourbon Barrel Aged Expedition Stout. Supplication? I’ve got one in my mini-fridge. The reason I’m telling you this is because I want to frame my statements here properly. I’ve had good beer, trust me. The best beer I’ve ever had, though, was a Miller Lite.

CATEGORIES: Beer   MIDWEST   Midwest Feature  

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

202 queries in 2.799 seconds.